DEVELOPMENT OF LEXICAL-SEMANTIC GROUPS OF VERBS AND DIRECTIONAL VERBS USED IN OLD ENGLISH

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Mardonova Sitora Mardonova

Abstract

Walking verbs are a more open category than directional verbs. The movement of the shape relative to space is limited. Wälchli, for example, uses various studies of Latin prepositions to describe action verbs as “cardinal placements” (Wälchli, 2001: 300).
In addition, the verbs “towards”, “in”, “up”, “away”, “out” and “down” were used as subcategories of direction in Old and Medieval English. However, verbs such as "back, forward, along, through, and around \ circle" required additional categories. Dayexsis or perspective is not considered a type of direction. In Old English and Medieval English, the verbs “come” and “go” were interpreted as the equivalent of direction. In L. Talmi's view, this is considered as a separate type of semantic components and is called "direction" (Talmi, 1985: 135).

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